Can I get a refill?

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Can I get a refill?

Coffee increases the risk of heart disease! Coffee lowers the risk of dementia! Coffee increases cholesterol! Coffee regulates glucose levels! Coffee causes hallucinations!

It feels like there are new contrasting studies about the effects of coffee popping up in the news every week, providing new justifications for coffee addicts and for those who are concerned about them.

Several years ago, I actually had the chance to participate in a study that measured the effects of caffeine on glucose levels. I was lured by the idea of months of free coffee. I went through all the physical tests, got accepted, and then realized that I did not want to risk getting placebo (decaf) samples.

Bad Habit or Addiction?

There are conflicting opinions on classifying between bad habits and addictions as well. I looked at this Huffington Post article to help me classify my daily coffee habit. Does it cause me to lose sleep? Yes, BUT then it wakes me up. So that’s a draw. Can I quit cold turkey? I don’t want to risk the headache, so I haven’t tried this yet. Inconclusive! Are there any unethical problems bothering me? No, though my many coffee shop visits are definitely fiscally irresponsible. Does it regulate my mood and emotional state? Well, I would warn you not to joke around with me before my morning coffee. It is not pretty. OK, I see where this is going.

In a 2011 study, 54% of Americans agreed that “coffee makes me feel more like myself” so my answers to these questions are probably not that original. I bet you have your own justification for this indulgence, but take the poll below and pick your favorite one.

 

Can I supersize that?

OK, I admit I drink 30 ounces of coffee every morning. Yet this image disturbs me:

 

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